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American Heart Association CPR skills testing

2015 American Heart Association Guidelines for CPR & ECC

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2015 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC

In October 2015, the American Heart Association published the 2015 Guidelines for CPR and ECC in the research journal, and in December 2015, the transitional materials are out so that the American Heart Association instructors can start teaching the new guidelines in the CPR/ first aid/ ACLS/ PALS classes.  The new materials that are not transitional will be available around first and second quarter of 2016 for the instructors.  It is important to be aware of the highlighted changes regarding the 2015 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC.

2015 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC summarized highlights:

non-healthcare provider (Heartsaver) classes:

  • the option of providing a second epinephrine dose for a severe allergic reaction, if necessary
  • the option of waiting for the EMS to provide aspirin for heart attack patients
  • the option of correctly saving a missing tooth for medical personnel to try to implant rather than trying to re-implant the tooth yourself
  • adding a maximum speed of 120 compressions per minute for CPR

BLS classes:

  • assessment order for CPR has changed so that the breathing check is in conjunction with the pulse check instead of being in conjunction with the response check
  • adding a maximum compression speed of 120 compressions per minute for CPR
  • when possible to practice in class, make sure adult compressions are not more than 2.4 inches deep
  • do not lean on the chest to allow for full recoil with every compression
  • adding a minimum target % of compressions per minute (60%) so that compressions are being performed at least 60% of the time during the CPR process
  • if an advanced airway has been inserted, only squeeze the BVM once every 6 seconds

ACLS classes:

  • assessment order for CPR has changed so that the breathing check is in conjunction with the pulse check instead of being in conjunction with the response check; one must also get complete activation of emergency response after the pulse + breathing check even though the emergency response system was activated after finding no responsiveness
  •  adding a maximum compression speed of 120 compressions per minute for CPR
  • when possible to practice in class, make sure adult compressions are not more than 2.4 inches deep
  • if an advanced airway has been inserted, only squeeze the BVM once every 6 seconds
  • after ROSC, but still in a coma, all patients need therapeutic hypothermia of 32 to 36 degrees Celsius for a minimum of 24 hours
  • the standard utilization of cold IV fluid for therapeutic hypothermia in the pre-hospital setting is not recommended
  • the cardiac arrest algorithm no longer includes vasopressin
  • if cardiac arrest onset includes an initial non-shockable rhythm, provide the epinephrine dose ASAP

Because of these changes, it is important to become updated on the new science.  If you are a healthcare professional and your card does not expire for a while, you can learn about the updated science here; just click on the class titled:  “2015 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC Science In-Service”!  You are also encouraged to renew your CPR/ BLS/ ACLS certification early so that you have the in-person grasp of the new guidelines.  The hands-on part with the manikins are arguably the most important part of these classes, which is why it is critical to update your certification as soon as possible!

Just call Lifesaver CPR (214-704-3891) to schedule your CPR/ BLS/ first aid/ ACLS class today so that you can become emergency prepared with learning the new 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines for CPR and ECC!

American Heart Association CPR skills testing

American Heart Association CPR skills testing

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Tim Garbett